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Robert Williams is an internet application developer for the Salem Web Network.
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The opinions expressed herein are my own personal opinions and do not represent my employer's view in anyway.


ISO to USB Flash Drive

If you have a laptop or a mini computer without a cd/dvd-rom drive, or your CD/DVD-ROM drive simply broke but you need to use a bootable cd, you can substitute a USB flash memory stick or pen drive in its place. Obviously, if you don't already have an ISO image of your disc, you will need to use another computer that has a functioning CD/DVD-ROM drive to create one. To do this, use some sort of CD Burning software such as Slysoft CloneCD, Nero Burning Rom, etc. to create your ISO image. Then all you need to do download a tool like UNetbootin or BootMyIso and follow the onscreen instructions to make your bootable Flash drive. These tools were designed to create Live versions of Linux, but they do work equally well with any bootable ISO image such as your Windows operating system disk, or Symantec Ghost Recovery disc. Just to be clear, they will not make Windows run live from a USB stick in the same way you can run Ubuntu from a flash drive, but they will allow you to boot your PC into the setup screens required to install Windows on your system in just the same way you could with the original CD and an optical drive.


Posted by Williarob on Monday, March 22, 2010 9:43 AM
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Dynamically setting the Elmah connection string at runtime

If you have read my other articles about setting the SQL Membership provider's connection string at runtime, or automatically detecting the server name and using the appropriate connection strings then it will come as no surprise to see that I also had to find a way to set the Elmah connection string property dynamically too. If you are reading this, I'll assume that you already know what Elmah is and how to configure it. The problem then is simply that the connection string is supplied in the <elmah><errorLog> section of the web.config using a connection string name, and that while the name may the same in production as it is in development, chances are high that the connection string itself is different. The connection string property is readonly, so you can't change it at runtime. One solution is to create an elmah.config file, and use Finalbuilder or a web deployment project to change the path to that file when publishing, but if you like the AdvancedSettingsManager class I created and want to use that to set it you'll need to use a custom ErrorLog. Fortunately, Elmah is open source, so I simply downloaded the source, took a look at their SqlErrorLog class and then copied and pasted most of the code from that class into my own project, modifying it only slightly to suit my own needs.

In the end, the only changes I really needed to make were to pull the connectionstring by name from my AdvancedSettingsManager class and to copy a couple of helper functions locally into this class since they were marked as internal and therefore unavailable outside of the Elmah solution. I also removed the conditional compilation flags that only applied to .Net 1.x since this was a .Net 3.5 project.

namespace Williablog.Core.Providers

{

    #region Imports

 

    using System;

    using System.Configuration;

    using System.Data;

    using System.Data.SqlClient;

    using System.Diagnostics;

    using System.Threading;

    using System.Xml;

 

    using Elmah;

 

    using ApplicationException = System.ApplicationException;

    using IDictionary = System.Collections.IDictionary;

    using IList = System.Collections.IList;

 

    #endregion

 

    public class SqlErrorLog : ErrorLog

    {

        private readonly string _connectionString;

 

        private const int _maxAppNameLength = 60;

 

        private delegate RV Function<RV, A>(A a);

 

        ///<summary>

        /// Initializes a new instance of the <see cref="SqlErrorLog"/> class

        /// using a dictionary of configured settings.

        ///</summary>

 

        public SqlErrorLog(IDictionary config)

        {

            if (config == null)

                throw new ArgumentNullException("config");

 

// Start Williablog changes

 

            string connectionStringName = (string)config["connectionStringName"] jQuery1520895691458676146_1360618079128 string.Empty;

 

            string connectionString = string.Empty;

 

            if (connectionStringName.Length > 0)

            {

 

            //

            // Write your code here to get the connection string as a ConnectionStringSettings object

 

            //

                ConnectionStringSettings settings = Williablog.Core.Configuration.AdvancedSettingsManager.SettingsFactory().ConnectionStrings["ErrorDB"];

                if (settings == null)

                    throw new ApplicationException("Connection string is missing for the SQL error log.");

 

                connectionString = settings.ConnectionString ?? string.Empty;

            }

 

// End Williablog changes

 

            //

            // If there is no connection string to use then throw an

            // exception to abort construction.

            //

 

            if (connectionString.Length == 0)

                throw new ApplicationException("Connection string is missing for the SQL error log.");

 

            _connectionString = connectionString;

 

            //

            // Set the application name as this implementation provides

            // per-application isolation over a single store.

            //

 

            string appName = NullString((string)config["applicationName"]);

 

            if (appName.Length > _maxAppNameLength)

            {

                throw new ApplicationException(string.Format(

                    "Application name is too long. Maximum length allowed is {0} characters.",

                    _maxAppNameLength.ToString("N0")));

            }

 

            ApplicationName = appName;

        }

 

        ///<summary>

        /// Initializes a new instance of the <see cref="SqlErrorLog"/> class

        /// to use a specific connection string for connecting to the database.

        ///</summary>

 

        public SqlErrorLog(string connectionString)

        {

            if (connectionString == null)

                throw new ArgumentNullException("connectionString");

 

            if (connectionString.Length == 0)

                throw new ArgumentException(null, "connectionString");

 

            _connectionString = connectionString;

        }

 

        ///<summary>

        /// Gets the name of this error log implementation.

        ///</summary>

 

        public override string Name

        {

            get { return "Microsoft SQL Server Error Log"; }

        }

 

        ///<summary>

        /// Gets the connection string used by the log to connect to the database.

        ///</summary>

 

        public virtual string ConnectionString

        {

            get { return _connectionString; }

        }

 

        ///<summary>

        /// Logs an error to the database.

        ///</summary>

        ///<remarks>

        /// Use the stored procedure called by this implementation to set a

        /// policy on how long errors are kept in the log. The default

        /// implementation stores all errors for an indefinite time.

        ///</remarks>

 

        public override string Log(Error error)

        {

            if (error == null)

                throw new ArgumentNullException("error");

 

            string errorXml = ErrorXml.EncodeString(error);

            Guid id = Guid.NewGuid();

 

            using (SqlConnection connection = new SqlConnection(this.ConnectionString))

            using (SqlCommand command = Commands.LogError(

                id, this.ApplicationName,

                error.HostName, error.Type, error.Source, error.Message, error.User,

                error.StatusCode, error.Time.ToUniversalTime(), errorXml))

            {

                command.Connection = connection;

                connection.Open();

                command.ExecuteNonQuery();

                return id.ToString();

            }

        }

 

        ///<summary>

        /// Returns a page of errors from the databse in descending order

        /// of logged time.

        ///</summary>

 

        public override int GetErrors(int pageIndex, int pageSize, IList errorEntryList)

        {

            if (pageIndex < 0)

                throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("pageIndex", pageIndex, null);

 

            if (pageSize < 0)

                throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("pageSize", pageSize, null);

 

            using (SqlConnection connection = new SqlConnection(this.ConnectionString))

            using (SqlCommand command = Commands.GetErrorsXml(this.ApplicationName, pageIndex, pageSize))

            {

                command.Connection = connection;

                connection.Open();

 

                XmlReader reader = command.ExecuteXmlReader();

 

                try

                {

                    ErrorsXmlToList(reader, errorEntryList);

                }

                finally

                {

                    reader.Close();

                }

 

                int total;

                Commands.GetErrorsXmlOutputs(command, out total);

                return total;

            }

        }

 

        ///<summary>

        /// Begins an asynchronous version of <see cref="GetErrors"/>.

        ///</summary>

 

        public override IAsyncResult BeginGetErrors(int pageIndex, int pageSize, IList errorEntryList,

            AsyncCallback asyncCallback, object asyncState)

        {

            if (pageIndex < 0)

                throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("pageIndex", pageIndex, null);

 

            if (pageSize < 0)

                throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("pageSize", pageSize, null);

 

            //

            // Modify the connection string on the fly to support async

            // processing otherwise the asynchronous methods on the

            // SqlCommand will throw an exception. This ensures the

            // right behavior regardless of whether configured

            // connection string sets the Async option to true or not.

            //

 

            SqlConnectionStringBuilder csb = new SqlConnectionStringBuilder(this.ConnectionString);

            csb.AsynchronousProcessing = true;

            SqlConnection connection = new SqlConnection(csb.ConnectionString);

 

            //

            // Create the command object with input parameters initialized

            // and setup to call the stored procedure.

            //

 

            SqlCommand command = Commands.GetErrorsXml(this.ApplicationName, pageIndex, pageSize);

            command.Connection = connection;

 

            //

            // Create a closure to handle the ending of the async operation

            // and retrieve results.

            //

 

            AsyncResultWrapper asyncResult = null;

 

            Function<int, IAsyncResult> endHandler = delegate

            {

                Debug.Assert(asyncResult != null);

 

                using (connection)

                using (command)

                {

                    using (XmlReader reader = command.EndExecuteXmlReader(asyncResult.InnerResult))

                        ErrorsXmlToList(reader, errorEntryList);

 

                    int total;

                    Commands.GetErrorsXmlOutputs(command, out total);

                    return total;

                }

            };

 

            //

            // Open the connenction and execute the command asynchronously,

            // returning an IAsyncResult that wrap the downstream one. This

            // is needed to be able to send our own AsyncState object to

            // the downstream IAsyncResult object. In order to preserve the

            // one sent by caller, we need to maintain and return it from

            // our wrapper.

            //

 

            try

            {

                connection.Open();

 

                asyncResult = new AsyncResultWrapper(

                    command.BeginExecuteXmlReader(

                        asyncCallback != null ? /* thunk */ delegate { asyncCallback(asyncResult); } : (AsyncCallback)null,

                        endHandler), asyncState);

 

                return asyncResult;

            }

            catch (Exception)

            {

                connection.Dispose();

                throw;

            }

        }

 

        ///<summary>

        /// Ends an asynchronous version of <see cref="ErrorLog.GetErrors"/>.

        ///</summary>

 

        public override int EndGetErrors(IAsyncResult asyncResult)

        {

            if (asyncResult == null)

                throw new ArgumentNullException("asyncResult");

 

            AsyncResultWrapper wrapper = asyncResult as AsyncResultWrapper;

 

            if (wrapper == null)

                throw new ArgumentException("Unexepcted IAsyncResult type.", "asyncResult");

 

            Function<int, IAsyncResult> endHandler = (Function<int, IAsyncResult>)wrapper.InnerResult.AsyncState;

            return endHandler(wrapper.InnerResult);

        }

 

        private void ErrorsXmlToList(XmlReader reader, IList errorEntryList)

        {

            Debug.Assert(reader != null);

 

            if (errorEntryList != null)

            {

                while (reader.IsStartElement("error"))

                {

                    string id = reader.GetAttribute("errorId");

                    Error error = ErrorXml.Decode(reader);

                    errorEntryList.Add(new ErrorLogEntry(this, id, error));

                }

            }

        }

 

        ///<summary>

        /// Returns the specified error from the database, or null

        /// if it does not exist.

        ///</summary>

        public override ErrorLogEntry GetError(string id)

        {

            if (id == null)

                throw new ArgumentNullException("id");

 

            if (id.Length == 0)

                throw new ArgumentException(null, "id");

 

            Guid errorGuid;

 

            try

            {

                errorGuid = new Guid(id);

            }

            catch (FormatException e)

            {

                throw new ArgumentException(e.Message, "id", e);

            }

 

            string errorXml;

 

            using (SqlConnection connection = new SqlConnection(this.ConnectionString))

            using (SqlCommand command = Commands.GetErrorXml(this.ApplicationName, errorGuid))

            {

                command.Connection = connection;

                connection.Open();

                errorXml = (string)command.ExecuteScalar();

            }

 

            if (errorXml == null)

                return null;

 

            Error error = ErrorXml.DecodeString(errorXml);

            return new ErrorLogEntry(this, id, error);

        }

 

// These utility functions were marked as internal, so I had to copy them locally

        public static string NullString(string s)

        {

            return s ?? string.Empty;

        }

 

        public static string EmptyString(string s, string filler)

        {

            return NullString(s).Length == 0 ? filler : s;

        }

 

// End

 

        private sealed class Commands

        {

            private Commands() { }

 

            public static SqlCommand LogError(

                Guid id,

                string appName,

                string hostName,

                string typeName,

                string source,

                string message,

                string user,

                int statusCode,

                DateTime time,

                string xml)

            {

                SqlCommand command = new SqlCommand("ELMAH_LogError");

                command.CommandType = CommandType.StoredProcedure;

 

                SqlParameterCollection parameters = command.Parameters;

 

                parameters.Add("@ErrorId", SqlDbType.UniqueIdentifier).Value = id;

                parameters.Add("@Application", SqlDbType.NVarChar, _maxAppNameLength).Value = appName;

                parameters.Add("@Host", SqlDbType.NVarChar, 30).Value = hostName;

                parameters.Add("@Type", SqlDbType.NVarChar, 100).Value = typeName;

                parameters.Add("@Source", SqlDbType.NVarChar, 60).Value = source;

                parameters.Add("@Message", SqlDbType.NVarChar, 500).Value = message;

                parameters.Add("@User", SqlDbType.NVarChar, 50).Value = user;

                parameters.Add("@AllXml", SqlDbType.NText).Value = xml;

                parameters.Add("@StatusCode", SqlDbType.Int).Value = statusCode;

                parameters.Add("@TimeUtc", SqlDbType.DateTime).Value = time;

 

                return command;

            }

 

            public static SqlCommand GetErrorXml(string appName, Guid id)

            {

                SqlCommand command = new SqlCommand("ELMAH_GetErrorXml");

                command.CommandType = CommandType.StoredProcedure;

 

                SqlParameterCollection parameters = command.Parameters;

                parameters.Add("@Application", SqlDbType.NVarChar, _maxAppNameLength).Value = appName;

                parameters.Add("@ErrorId", SqlDbType.UniqueIdentifier).Value = id;

 

                return command;

            }

 

            public static SqlCommand GetErrorsXml(string appName, int pageIndex, int pageSize)

            {

                SqlCommand command = new SqlCommand("ELMAH_GetErrorsXml");

                command.CommandType = CommandType.StoredProcedure;

 

                SqlParameterCollection parameters = command.Parameters;

 

                parameters.Add("@Application", SqlDbType.NVarChar, _maxAppNameLength).Value = appName;

                parameters.Add("@PageIndex", SqlDbType.Int).Value = pageIndex;

                parameters.Add("@PageSize", SqlDbType.Int).Value = pageSize;

                parameters.Add("@TotalCount", SqlDbType.Int).Direction = ParameterDirection.Output;

 

                return command;

            }

 

            public static void GetErrorsXmlOutputs(SqlCommand command, out int totalCount)

            {

                Debug.Assert(command != null);

 

                totalCount = (int)command.Parameters["@TotalCount"].Value;

            }

        }

 

        ///<summary>

        /// An <see cref="IAsyncResult"/> implementation that wraps another.

        ///</summary>

 

        private sealed class AsyncResultWrapper : IAsyncResult

        {

            private readonly IAsyncResult _inner;

            private readonly object _asyncState;

 

            public AsyncResultWrapper(IAsyncResult inner, object asyncState)

            {

                _inner = inner;

                _asyncState = asyncState;

            }

 

            public IAsyncResult InnerResult

            {

                get { return _inner; }

            }

 

            public bool IsCompleted

            {

                get { return _inner.IsCompleted; }

            }

 

            public WaitHandle AsyncWaitHandle

            {

                get { return _inner.AsyncWaitHandle; }

            }

 

            public object AsyncState

            {

                get { return _asyncState; }

            }

 

            public bool CompletedSynchronously

            {

                get { return _inner.CompletedSynchronously; }

            }

        }

    }

}

Finally all you need to do is modify the web.config file to use this SqlErrorlog instead of the built in one:

  <elmah>  

    <errorLogtype="Williablog.Core.Providers.SqlErrorLog, Williablog.Core"

            connectionStringName="ErrorDB" />

<!--

            Other elmah settings ommitted for clarity

-->

  </elmah>

Note: You will still need to reference the Elmah dll in your project as all we have done here is subclass the ErrorLog type, all of the remaining Elmah goodness is still locked up inside the elmah dll. You could of course make these changes directly inside the elmah source code and recompile it to produce your own version of the elmah dll, but these changes were project specific and I didn't want to end up one day with dozens of project specific versions of the elmah dll. This way, the project specific code stays with the project and the elmah dll remains untouched.

Edit: As Stan Shillis points out on the Code project version of this article, there is a cleaner, simpler approach that will allow you to keep up with new versions of Elmah without editing the source of each release:

Instead of fully rewriting Elmah's SQLErrorLog you can inherit it and override just the ConnectingString property. This way you don't loose benefits of Elmah code updates.
 
Sample code:

public class CustomSqlErrorLog : Elmah.SqlErrorLog
{
	protected string connectionStringName;
	public CustomSqlErrorLog(IDictionary config) : base(config)
	{
		connectionStringName = (string)config["connectionStringName"];
	}
 
	public override string ConnectionString {
		get { return CustomConfigManager.ConnectionStrings[connectionStringName]; }
	}
}

 
The only caveat is that you still have to have that connection string entry in your web.config ConnectionStrings sections because SqlErrorLog base class checks for its existence. It won't actually use the connection string from config file but it needs to be there for it work properly.
 
Sample config:
 

<elmah>
<errorLog type="YourNameSpace.CustomSqlErrorLog, YourAssembly" connectionStringName="Elmah" applicationName="CustomApp" />
</elmah>
 
<connectionStrings>
    <add name="Elmah" connectionString="do.not.change.or.remove.this" providerName="System.Data.SqlClient" />
</connectionStrings>

Categories: ASP.Net | C# | CodeProject
Posted by Williarob on Thursday, March 18, 2010 12:10 PM
Permalink | Comments (0) | Post RSSRSS comment feed

Auto detect the runtime environment and use the right app settings and connection strings

There are many ways to manage the problem of connection string and app settings substitution in the web.config / app.config files when publishing to different environments (e.g. QA and Production servers). In the past I have made use of the Web Deployment project's ability to replace the appsettings and connectionstrings sections, I have experimented with batch files, Build events, conditional compilation and used the extremely powerful FinalBuilder. However, my prefered solution is to have a single shared .config file with all the possible settings in it (so you only have to open one file to change any of the settings) then have the executing application automatically detect the environment and use the correct settings every time.

The technique dicussed below builds on that of an earlier article which described how to centralize your shared application settings and connection strings in a common class library. It also assumes that you know the machine names of your development, QA and production servers. Obviously servers get replaced from time to time and websites sometimes get moved from one server to another, but it has been my experience that there is usually some sort of common naming convention used on servers and web farms, and knowing that convention should be good enough. Even this is not the case, the Development, QA and Production server names are stored in an app setting so you can easily change them at any time if necessary. For this example, the assumption is that the development servers are all named something like "Squirrel01", "Squirrel02", the QA boxes are "Fox01", "Fox02", and the production (farm) boxes are "Rabbit01x", "Rabbit01y", "Rabbit02x", "Rabbit02y", etc. With this in mind, it is necessary only to look for the words "Rabbit", "Fox" or "Squirrel" in the machine name we are running on to identify the current environment and know which section of our config file to use. If none of these names is found, we shall assume the app is running on the localhost of a developer's computer, and use those settings. I should point out that it is possible to for a server to be configured in such a way as to prevent Environment.MachineName from returning a value, in which case this technique simply will not work, so before you start trying to integrate this code into your solution, I recommend you craete a quick test.aspx page or console app that simply does a Response.Write(Environment.MachineName)/Console.WriteLine(Environment.MachineName) and run it on your servers.

First, let's setup our .config file:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8" ?>

<configuration>

  <configSections>

    <sectionGroup name="Localhost" type="Williablog.Core.Configuration.EnvironmentSectionGroup, Williablog.Core">

      <section name="appSettings" type="System.Configuration.AppSettingsSection, System.Configuration, Version=2.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b03f5f7f11d50a3a" restartOnExternalChanges="false" requirePermission="false" />

      <section name="connectionStrings" type="System.Configuration.ConnectionStringsSection, System.Configuration, Version=2.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b03f5f7f11d50a3a" requirePermission="false" />

    </sectionGroup>

 

    <sectionGroup name="Dev" type="Williablog.Core.Configuration.EnvironmentSectionGroup, Williablog.Core">

      <section name="appSettings" type="System.Configuration.AppSettingsSection, System.Configuration, Version=2.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b03f5f7f11d50a3a" restartOnExternalChanges="false" requirePermission="false" />

      <section name="connectionStrings" type="System.Configuration.ConnectionStringsSection, System.Configuration, Version=2.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b03f5f7f11d50a3a" requirePermission="false" />

    </sectionGroup>

 

    <sectionGroup name="Qa" type="Williablog.Core.Configuration.EnvironmentSectionGroup, Williablog.Core">

      <section name="appSettings" type="System.Configuration.AppSettingsSection, System.Configuration, Version=2.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b03f5f7f11d50a3a" restartOnExternalChanges="false" requirePermission="false" />

      <section name="connectionStrings" type="System.Configuration.ConnectionStringsSection, System.Configuration, Version=2.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b03f5f7f11d50a3a" requirePermission="false" />

    </sectionGroup>

 

    <sectionGroup name="Production" type="Williablog.Core.Configuration.EnvironmentSectionGroup, Williablog.Core">

      <section name="appSettings" type="System.Configuration.AppSettingsSection, System.Configuration, Version=2.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b03f5f7f11d50a3a" restartOnExternalChanges="false" requirePermission="false" />

      <section name="connectionStrings" type="System.Configuration.ConnectionStringsSection, System.Configuration, Version=2.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b03f5f7f11d50a3a" requirePermission="false" />

    </sectionGroup>

  </configSections>

 

  <Localhost>

    <appSettings>

      <add key="WebServiceUrl" value="http://webservices.squirrel01.yourserver.com/YourService.asmx"/>

      <add key="SmtpServer" value="smtp.yourlocalmailserver.com"/>

    </appSettings>

    <connectionStrings>

      <add name="AppData" connectionString="data source=Ford01;initial catalog=MyDB;User ID=User;Password=Password;" providerName="System.Data.SqlClient"/>

      <add name="ElmahDB" connectionString="Database=ELMAH;Server=Ford02;User=User;Pwd=Password;" providerName="System.Data.SqlClient"/>

    </connectionStrings>

  </Localhost>

 

  <Dev>

    <appSettings>

      <add key="WebServiceUrl" value="http://webservices.squirrel01.yourserver.com/YourService.asmx"/>

      <add key="SmtpServer" value="smtp.yourlocalmailserver.com"/>

    </appSettings>

    <connectionStrings>

      <add name="AppData" connectionString="data source=Ford01;initial catalog=MyDB;User ID=User;Password=Password;" providerName="System.Data.SqlClient"/>

      <add name="ElmahDB" connectionString="Database=ELMAH;Server=Ford02;User=User;Pwd=Password;" providerName="System.Data.SqlClient"/>

    </connectionStrings>

  </Dev>

 

  <Qa>

    <appSettings>

      <add key="WebServiceUrl" value="http://webservices.Fox01.yourserver.com/YourService.asmx"/>

      <add key="SmtpServer" value="smtp.yourlocalmailserver.com"/>

    </appSettings>

    <connectionStrings>

      <add name="AppData" connectionString="data source=BMW01;initial catalog=MyDB;User ID=User;Password=Password;" providerName="System.Data.SqlClient"/>

      <add name="ElmahDB" connectionString="Database=ELMAH;Server=BMW02;User=User;Pwd=Password;" providerName="System.Data.SqlClient"/>

    </connectionStrings>

  </Qa>

 

  <Production>

    <appSettings>

      <add key="WebServiceUrl" value="http://webservices.yourserver.com/YourService.asmx"/>

      <add key="SmtpServer" value="smtp.yourmailserver.com"/>

    </appSettings>

    <connectionStrings>

      <add name="AppData" connectionString="data source=Audi01;initial catalog=MyDB;User ID=User;Password=Password;" providerName="System.Data.SqlClient"/>

      <add name="ElmahDB" connectionString="Database=ELMAH;Server=Audi02;User=User;Pwd=Password;" providerName="System.Data.SqlClient"/>

    </connectionStrings>

  </Production>

 

  <appSettings>

    <!-- Global/common appsettings can go here -->

    <add key="Test" value="Hello World"/>

 

    <add key="DevelopmentNames" value="SQUIRREL"/>

    <add key="ProductionNames" value="RABBIT"/>

    <add key="QANames" value="FOX"/>

    <add key="EnvironmentOverride" value=""/>

    <!-- /Dev | /Localhost | /Production | (blank)-->

 

  </appSettings>

</configuration>

As you can see, the first thing we do in the config file is declare four section groups, "LocalHost", "Dev", "Qa" and "Production". I chose to create a custom SectionGroup since this allowed me to strongly type the expected sections within it, greatly simplifying the code required to access those sections. All the EnvironmentSectionGroup class does, is inherit ConfigurationSectionGroup and declare two properties:

namespace Williablog.Core.Configuration

{

    using System.Configuration;

 

    public class EnvironmentSectionGroup : ConfigurationSectionGroup

    {

 

        #region Properties

 

        [ConfigurationProperty("appSettings")]

        public AppSettingsSection AppSettings

        {

            get

            {

                return (AppSettingsSection)Sections["appSettings"];

            }

        }

 

        [ConfigurationProperty("connectionStrings")]

        public ConnectionStringsSection ConnectionStrings

        {

            get

            {

                return (ConnectionStringsSection)Sections["connectionStrings"];

            }

        }

 

        #endregion

 

    }

}

Next, we create the sections for localhost, development, qa and production, each of which has its own appSettings and connectionStrings sections. These are of the same type as the connectionStrings and appSettings found in any .config file, meaning we don't need to write any additional code to fully utilise these sections - no traversing of primitive xmlNodes or anything like that to get the connectionstrings from that section. Finally we add the expected, normal appsettings section which in this case will provide the global or common appsettings that are shared by all environments. It is here that we store the server names that will help us identify where the app is currently executing. The EnvironmentOverride setting is an added bonus -it allows you to use all of qa or production settings while running on localhost which helps you debug those "well it works on my machine" situations without having to manually change all of the settings for localhost.

Building on the BasicSettingsManager we built earlier we simply add some code to determine the machine name we are running on and return the appSettings and connectionStrings sections appropriate to that environment:

namespace Williablog.Core.Configuration

{

    using System;

    using System.Collections.Specialized;

    using System.Configuration;

    using System.IO;

    using System.Linq;

 

    public class AdvancedSettingsManager

    {

        #region fields

 

        private const string ConfigurationFileName = "Williablog.Core.config";

 

        /// <summary>

        /// default path to the config file that contains the settings we are using

        /// </summary>

        private static string configurationFile;

 

        /// <summary>

        /// Stores an instance of this class, to cut down on I/O: No need to keep re-loading that config file

        /// </summary>

        /// <remarks>Cannot use system.web.caching since agents will not have access to this by default, so use static member instead.</remarks>

        private static AdvancedSettingsManager instance;

 

        /// <summary>

        /// Settings Environment

        /// </summary>

        private static string settingsEnvironment;

 

        private static EnvironmentSectionGroup currentSettingsGroup;

 

        #endregion

 

        #region Constructors

 

        private AdvancedSettingsManager()

        {

            ExeConfigurationFileMap fileMap = new ExeConfigurationFileMap();

 

            fileMap.ExeConfigFilename = configurationFile;

 

            Configuration config = ConfigurationManager.OpenMappedExeConfiguration(fileMap, ConfigurationUserLevel.None);

 

            settingsEnvironment = "Localhost"; // default to localhost

 

            // get the name of the machine we are currently running on

            string machineName = Environment.MachineName.ToUpper();

 

            // compare to known environment machine names

            if (config.AppSettings.Settings["ProductionNames"].Value.Split(',').Where(x => machineName.Contains(x)).Count() > 0)

            {

                settingsEnvironment = "Production";

            }

            else if (config.AppSettings.Settings["QANames"].Value.Split(',').Where(x => machineName.Contains(x)).Count() > 0)

            {

                settingsEnvironment = "Qa";

            }

            else if (config.AppSettings.Settings["DevelopmentNames"].Value.Split(',').Where(x => machineName.Contains(x)).Count() > 0)

            {

                settingsEnvironment = "Dev";

            }

 

            // If there is a value in the EnvironmentOverride appsetting, ignore results of auto detection and set it here

            // This allows us to hit production data from localhost without monkeying with all the config settings.

            if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(config.AppSettings.Settings["EnvironmentOverride"].Value))

            {

                settingsEnvironment = config.AppSettings.Settings["EnvironmentOverride"].Value;

            }

 

            // Get the name of the section we are using in this environment & load the appropriate section of the config file

            currentSettingsGroup = config.GetSectionGroup(SettingsEnvironment) as EnvironmentSectionGroup;

        }

 

        #endregion

 

        #region Properties

 

        /// <summary>

        /// Returns the name of the current environment

        /// </summary>

        public string SettingsEnvironment

        {

            get

            {

                return settingsEnvironment;

            }

        }

 

        /// <summary>

        /// Returns the ConnectionStrings section

        /// </summary>

        public ConnectionStringSettingsCollection ConnectionStrings

        {

            get

            {

                return currentSettingsGroup.ConnectionStrings.ConnectionStrings;

            }

        }

 

        /// <summary>

        /// Returns the AppSettings Section

        /// </summary>

        public NameValueCollection AppSettings

        {

            get

            {

                NameValueCollection settings = new NameValueCollection();

                foreach (KeyValueConfigurationElement element in currentSettingsGroup.AppSettings.Settings)

                {

                    settings.Add(element.Key, element.Value);

                }

 

                return settings;

            }

        }

 

        #endregion

 

        #region static factory methods

 

        /// <summary>

        /// Public factory method

        /// </summary>

        /// <returns></returns>

        public static AdvancedSettingsManager SettingsFactory()

        {

            // If there is a bin folder, such as in web projects look for the config file there first

            if (Directory.Exists(AppDomain.CurrentDomain.BaseDirectory + @"\bin"))

            {

                configurationFile = string.Format(@"{0}\bin\{1}", AppDomain.CurrentDomain.BaseDirectory, ConfigurationFileName);

            }

            else

            {

                // agents, for example, won't have a bin folder in production

                configurationFile = Path.Combine(AppDomain.CurrentDomain.BaseDirectory, ConfigurationFileName);

            }

 

            // If we still cannot find it, quit now!

            if (!File.Exists(configurationFile))

            {

                throw new FileNotFoundException(configurationFile);

            }

 

            return CreateSettingsFactoryInternal();

        }

 

        /// <summary>

        /// Overload that allows you to pass in the full path and filename of the config file you want to use.

        /// </summary>

        /// <param name="fullPathToConfigFile"></param>

        /// <returns></returns>

        public static AdvancedSettingsManager SettingsFactory(string fullPathToConfigFile)

        {

            configurationFile = fullPathToConfigFile;

            return CreateSettingsFactoryInternal();

        }

 

        /// <summary>internal Factory Method

        /// </summary>

        /// <returns>ConfigurationSettings object

        /// </returns>

        internal static AdvancedSettingsManager CreateSettingsFactoryInternal()

        {

            // If we havent created an instance yet, do so now

            if (instance == null)

            {

                instance = new AdvancedSettingsManager();

            }

 

            return instance;

        }

 

        #endregion

    }

}

As before you can then access the appSettings of the Core.Config from any of your projects like so:

Console.WriteLine(Williablog.Core.Configuration.AdvancedSettingsManager.SettingsFactory().AppSettings["Test"]);

To make this work, you will need to add a reference to System.Configuration. If the config file and Settings manager code is to be part of a class library, you will need to set the "Copy to Output Directory" property of your .config file to "Copy always"and add a reference to System.Configuration to each of your projects.

Download the Williablog.Core project: Williablog.Core.zip (100.77 kb)


Posted by Williarob on Thursday, March 18, 2010 9:00 AM
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How to store shared app settings and connection strings with your class library

When working on enterprise level, multi-tiered .Net applications it is not uncommon to want to create a shared class library, that may be used in multiple related projects. For example, let's suppose you are building a public website, a separate private intranet website used by company staff to manage the public site, and one or more console applications that may run as scheduled tasks related to both sites. You may have an console application that creates and emails reports about sales and other data, and another app that encodes video or audio that is uploaded to your site. Finally, you probably have another project for unit tests.

Since all of these projects will be working with the same database you also have a class library in your solution acting as your datalayer, and perhaps another Core library that contains other shared components. Each of these projects has it's own web.config or app.config file, and you had to copy and paste your connection string, smtp server data, and various other appSettings required by all the projects into every .config file. You may be inspired to add a new .config file to your Core library, and store all of the shared appsettings and connection strings in that one central location. If you then delete all of these settings from the other .config files you'll quickly realize that everything breaks. Even setting the "Copy to Output Directory" property of your Core.config file to "Copy always" doesn't fix this. The reason for this of course is that .Net always looks to the host application for the settings.

The solution is to add some code to your Core project that explicitly loads the Core.config file, reads in the data and makes the results available to all the other projects. That code might look something like this:

namespace Williablog.Core.Configuration

{

    using System;

    using System.Collections.Specialized;

    using System.Configuration;

    using System.IO;

 

    public class BasicSettingsManager

    {

        #region fields

 

        private const string ConfigurationFileName = "Williablog.Core.config";

 

        /// <summary>

        /// default path to the config file that contains the settings we are using

        /// </summary>

        private static string configurationFile;

 

        /// <summary>

        /// Stores an instance of this class, to cut down on I/O: No need to keep re-loading that config file

        /// </summary>

        /// <remarks>Cannot use system.web.caching since agents will not have access to this by default, so use static member instead.</remarks>

        private static BasicSettingsManager instance;

 

        private static Configuration config;

 

        #endregion

 

        #region Constructors

 

        private BasicSettingsManager()

        {

            ExeConfigurationFileMap fileMap = new ExeConfigurationFileMap();

            fileMap.ExeConfigFilename = configurationFile;

            config = ConfigurationManager.OpenMappedExeConfiguration(fileMap, ConfigurationUserLevel.None);

        }

 

        #endregion

 

        #region Properties

 

        /// <summary>

        /// Returns the ConnectionStrings section

        /// </summary>

        public ConnectionStringSettingsCollection ConnectionStrings

        {

            get

            {

                return config.ConnectionStrings.ConnectionStrings;

            }

        }

 

        /// <summary>

        /// Returns the AppSettings Section

        /// </summary>

        public NameValueCollection AppSettings

        {

            get

            {

                NameValueCollection settings = new NameValueCollection();

                foreach (KeyValueConfigurationElement element in config.AppSettings.Settings)

                {

                    settings.Add(element.Key, element.Value);

                }

 

                return settings;

            }

        }

 

        #endregion

 

        #region static factory methods

 

        /// <summary>

        /// Public factory method

        /// </summary>

        /// <returns></returns>

        public static BasicSettingsManager SettingsFactory()

        {

            // If there is a bin folder, such as in web projects look for the config file there first

            if (Directory.Exists(AppDomain.CurrentDomain.BaseDirectory + @"\bin"))

            {

                configurationFile = string.Format(@"{0}\bin\{1}", AppDomain.CurrentDomain.BaseDirectory, ConfigurationFileName);

            }

            else

            {

                // agents, for example, won't have a bin folder in production

                configurationFile = Path.Combine(AppDomain.CurrentDomain.BaseDirectory, ConfigurationFileName);

            }

 

            // If we still cannot find it, quit now!

            if (!File.Exists(configurationFile))

            {

                throw new FileNotFoundException(configurationFile);

            }

 

            return CreateSettingsFactoryInternal();

        }

 

        /// <summary>

        /// Overload that allows you to pass in the full path and filename of the config file you want to use.

        /// </summary>

        /// <param name="fullPathToConfigFile"></param>

        /// <returns></returns>

        public static BasicSettingsManager SettingsFactory(string fullPathToConfigFile)

        {

            configurationFile = fullPathToConfigFile;

            return CreateSettingsFactoryInternal();

        }

 

        /// <summary>internal Factory Method

        /// </summary>

        /// <returns>ConfigurationSettings object

        /// </returns>

        internal static BasicSettingsManager CreateSettingsFactoryInternal()

        {

            // If we havent created an instance yet, do so now

            if (instance == null)

            {

                instance = new BasicSettingsManager();

            }

 

            return instance;

        }

 

        #endregion

    }

}

You can then access the appSettings of Core.Config from any of your projects like so:

Console.WriteLine(Williablog.Core.Configuration.BasicSettingsManager.SettingsFactory().AppSettings["Key"]);

To make this work, you will need to set the "Copy to Output Directory" property of your Core.config file to "Copy always"and add a reference to System.Configuration to each of your projects.

We shall take this a step further next time and expand on this technique to enable your Core project to automatically detect wether it is running on localhost, a development environment, QA, or production, and to return the appropriate connection strings and settings for that environment.


Posted by Williarob on Thursday, March 18, 2010 8:08 AM
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Use lambda expressions to aggregate values into a delimited string

Let's say you need to aggregate one value from each object in a list into a single string. For Example, you want to send an e-mail to a set of customers. This requires a string with the email addresses seperated by a semicolon (;). The following code will create a generic List of Books, and provide a method ListAllEmails() that will print the delimited list of emails to the console window:

 

namespace ConsoleApplication1

{

    using System;

    using System.Collections.Generic;

    using System.Linq;

 

    public class Lambdas

    {

        /// <summary>

        /// Define the Book Class

        /// </summary>

        public class Book

        {

            public string Title { get; set; }

            public string Author { get; set; }

            public double Price { get; set; }

            public string EmailAddress { get; set; }

        }

 

        public List<Book> Books { get; private set; }

 

        public Lambdas()

        {

            // Create a new list of Books

            Books = new List<Book> {

                new Book { Title = "Pro ASP.Net MVC Framework", Author = "Steven Sanderson", Price = 49.99, EmailAddress = "steve@nospam.com" },

                new Book{ Title = "Pro Silverlight 2 in C# 2008", Author = "Matthew MacDonald", Price = 49.99, EmailAddress = "Matthew@nospam.com" },

                new Book{ Title = "Pro VB 2008 and the .Net 3.5 Platform", Author = "Andrew Troelsen", Price = 59.99, EmailAddress = "Andrew@nospam.com" }

            };

        }

 

        /// <summary>

        /// Creates a semicolon (;) delimited list of email addresses

        /// </summary>

        public void ListAllEmails()

        {

            Console.WriteLine(this.Books.Select(b => b.EmailAddress).Aggregate((items, item) => items + "; " + item));

            // output= "steve@nospam.com; Matthew@nospam.com; Andrew@nospam.com"

        }

    }

}

 

The Select Method selects the EmailAddress for each Book. The Aggregate method builds a list of the items based on the lambda expression. Notice that this did not require any additional code to ensure there is no extra semi-colon at the beginning or end of the list, which is often required when using a loop to concatenate text.

 

Note: Be careful when using the Aggregate method because it is very inefficient on large numbers of strings. Consider using the String Join method instead.

 

In VB, the lambda would look like this:

 

   Console.WriteLine(Books.Select(Function(b) b.EmailAddress).Aggregate(Function(items, item) items & "; " & item))

 

You can also filter the list of email addresses. For Example, suppose you want to send an email to all the authors who sell their books for under $50, telling them that you think you can sell their next book for $59.99:

 

        /// <summary>

        /// Creates a semicolon (;) delimited list of email addresses where the price of the book is under $50

        /// </summary>

        public void ListSomeEmails()

        {

            Console.WriteLine(this.Books.Where(b => b.Price < 50).Select(b => b.EmailAddress).Aggregate((items, item) => items + ", " + item));

            // output= "steve@nospam.com, Matthew@nospam.com"

        }

 

Let's take this one step further. Suppose you wanted to create a comma separated list of values and replace the last comma with " and", so that a single item would be "item1", two items would be "item1 and item2", three items would be "item1, item2 and item3", etc.

 

        /// <summary>

        /// Creates a comma delimited list of email addresses and replaces the last comma with " and "

        /// </summary>

        public void ListEmailsAsSmartCsv()

        {

            string csv = this.Books.Select(b => b.EmailAddress).Aggregate((items, item) => items + ", " + item);

            Console.WriteLine(Regex.Replace(csv, @",\s([^,]+)$", " and $1"));

            // output= "steve@nospam.com, Matthew@nospam.com and Andrew@nospam.com"

        }

 

 


Tags:
Categories: ASP.Net | C# | VB
Posted by Williarob on Friday, February 26, 2010 9:44 AM
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Taking P90X to the next level.

First let me start by saying that I think the P90X Workout system is great. The workouts are intense, effective and fun (at least once you are finally fit enough to do them - the first time I tried the Plyometrics Jump training I barely made it through the warm up and I'll admit I still don't look forward to it). However, I believe the system works best for people who are trying to lose a little weight and add some definition, rather than those of us who are already slim and trying to add 10 lbs or more of muscle. Having said that, if you follow the program closely and watch what you eat, you certainly will gain some muscle - my arms were noticeably bigger after 90 days and my body fat had dropped from around 14% to 7%, while my body weight remained the same.

About 5 months after I started the P90X program it became apparent to me, that all the exercises relying heavily on the use dumbbells added significantly more muscle than the workouts that rely more on body weight and gravity alone (such as Chest and Back which is mostly just push ups and pull ups). Sure my chest was toned and more than a little sore after these workouts, even after 90 days, but growth was minimal. Push ups can only take you so far, especially when you only weigh 150 lbs. Since I have a gym membership, I took the standard Chest and Back, and the Chest, Shoulders, Triceps workouts and replaced most of the push ups with exercises that can be done at the gym using the machines and free weights, and immediately felt that I had taken P90X to the next level. Here is my new Chest and Back Workout:

Date:          
Warm Up, Stretch, Std Push-Ups (25) 25 25 25 25 25
Wide Front Pull-Ups          
Incline Press (Barbell, 2 sets 8-12) R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
Reverse Grip Chin-Ups          
Incline Press (Dumbbell, 2 sets 8-12) R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
Closed Grip Overhand Pull-ups          
Bench Press (Barbell, 2 sets 8-12) R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
Heavy Pants R______W_______ R______W_______ R______W_______ R______W_______ R______W_______
Bench Press (Dumbbell, 2 sets 8-12) R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
Lawnmowers R______W_______ R______W_______ R______W_______ R______W_______ R______W_______
Decline Bench Press (Dumbbell or barbell, 2 sets 8-12) R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
Back Flies R______W_______ R______W_______ R______W_______ R______W_______ R______W_______
Decline Push-Ups (Max Reps/25) R_______________ R_______________ R_______________ R_______________ R_______________
Elbows-out Lawnmowers R______W_______ R______W_______ R______W_______ R______W_______ R______W_______
Incline Press (Machine, 2 sets 8-12) R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
Supermans 5 5 5 5 5
Bench Press (Machine, 2 sets 8-12) R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
CHEST & BACK          
           

Download this as an Excel Spreadsheet:

Chest & Back.xls (24.00 kb)

And here is my new Chest, Shoulders, Triceps workout:

Date:          
Warm Up, Stretch, Std Push-Ups (25) 25 25 25 25 25
In & Out Shoulder Flys R______W_______ R______W_______ R______W_______ R______W_______ R______W_______
Chair Dips R_______________ R_______________ R_______________ R_______________ R_______________
Incline Press (Barbell, 2 sets 8-12) R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
Deep Swimmer's Press R______W_______ R______W_______ R______W_______ R______W_______ R______W_______
Overhead Tricep Extensions R______W_______ R______W_______ R______W_______ R______W_______ R______W_______
Incline Press (Dumbbell, 2 sets 8-12) R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
Scarecrows R______W_______ R______W_______ R______W_______ R______W_______ R______W_______
Lying Tricep Extensions R______W_______ R______W_______ R______W_______ R______W_______ R______W_______
Bench Press (Barbell, 2 sets 8-12) R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
Y-Presses R______W_______ R______W_______ R______W_______ R______W_______ R______W_______
Side-Leaning Tricep Extensions R______W_______ R______W_______ R______W_______ R______W_______ R______W_______
Bench Press (Dumbbell, 2 sets 8-12) R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
Weighted Circles R______W_______ R______W_______ R______W_______ R______W_______ R______W_______
Throw the Bomb R______W_______ R______W_______ R______W_______ R______W_______ R______W_______
Decline Bench Press (Dumbbell or barbell, 2 sets) R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
Pour Flys (straight arms, out to sides, pour) R______W_______ R______W_______ R______W_______ R______W_______ R______W_______
Front-to-Back Tricep Extensions R______W_______ R______W_______ R______W_______ R______W_______ R______W_______
Incline Press (Machine, 2 sets 8-12) R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
Two-Angle Shoulder Flys R______W_______ R______W_______ R______W_______ R______W_______ R______W_______
Two-Arm Tricep Kickbacks R______W_______ R______W_______ R______W_______ R______W_______ R______W_______
Bench Press (Machine, 2 sets 8-12) R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
R______W_______
CHEST, SHOULDERS & TRICEPS      
           

Chest Shoulders & Triceps.xls (24.50 kb)

I think the Back and Biceps and the Shoulder, Biceps, Triceps workouts are great as they are, just keep upping the weight whenever you can, and every once in a while (to maintain that "Muscle confusion" - and this applies to the chest workouts too), start at the bottom of your worksheet and work you way up. This will help you avoid or break through a plateau. For example, the last exercise in the Back & Biceps workout is the strip set curl, which for 90 days was always last on the list and my muscles were always pretty cooked by the time I got there. By doing the workout in reverse, this is the first exercise and your muscles are fresh, you'll be able to start with at least 5 lbs more than normal and all of the exercises on the bottom half of your workout sheet will show improvement. (After 6 months of following the worksheets in order I was struggling to improve since my body was used to the movements by now. After doing it in reverse, my body ached the next day in a way it hadn't for quite some time and 2 weeks later when I came to do it again in the right order, I was finally able to up the weights on almost all the exercises. Just be sure to mark on the sheet that you did it backwards that week.

I have been using these new worksheets for 6 weeks now, and I have gained another 3 lbs of muscle, most of it on my chest.


Categories: P90X | Fitness
Posted by Williarob on Thursday, February 25, 2010 6:44 AM
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How to update multiple tables using T-SQL

Lets say you have a database made up of many tables. All of those tables have a field called "DateCreated" which cannot be null, but at the time the tables were created, you didn't think to set a default value for the field. Now you could open each table in design mode and set the default value manually, but here is an easier way:

The syntax to set a default value looks like this:

ALTER TABLE [table-name]
ADD CONSTRAINT constraint-name DEFAULT default-value FOR column-NAME;

While quicker that opening each table in design view this still only allows you to set the default value for a single table at a time. However, we can write some simple SQL that will generate a complete SQL Script for us:

SELECT 'ALTER TABLE [' + sysobjects.NAME +
'] ADD CONSTRAINT DF_' + sysobjects.NAME + '_DateCreated DEFAULT getdate()
FOR DateCreated;' from sysobjects inner join syscolumns on
sysobjects.id = syscolumns.id
inner join systypes on
syscolumns.xtype = systypes.xtype
WHERE syscolumns.NAME = 'DateCreated'

Run that query and each row returned will contain an Alter Table statement for each table. Simply highlight all the rows returned, then copy and paste them to a new query and run it. The SysObjects table contains one row for each object (table, column, constraint, default, log, rule, stored procedure, and so on) created within a database. This means you could write a query to update the sysobjects table directly and make this even easier, but if you mess up the sysobjects table your database could be trashed so use caution if you go that route.


Categories: SQL Server
Posted by Williarob on Friday, February 19, 2010 1:35 PM
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Simplify Your Code with Lambda Expressions

Most applications retain lists of things, and a common task is to find an item in that list. The following class illustrates three ways to find an item in a generic list:

 

namespace ConsoleApplication1

{

    using System;

    using System.Collections.Generic;

    using System.Linq;

 

    public class Lambdas

    {

        public class Book

        {

            public string Title { get; set; }

            public string Author { get; set; }

            public double Price { get; set; }

        }

 

        public List<Book> Books { get; private set; }

 

        public Lambdas()

        {

            Books = new List<Book> {

                new Book { Title = "Pro ASP.Net MVC Framework", Author = "Steven Sanderson", Price = 49.99 },

                new Book{ Title = "Pro Silverlight 2 in C# 2008", Author = "Matthew MacDonald", Price = 49.99},

                new Book{ Title = "Pro VB 2008 and the .Net 3.5 Platform", Author = "Andrew Troelsen", Price = 59.99 }

            };

        }

 

        /// <summary>

        /// Returns a book using a traditional loop

        /// </summary>

        private Book FindUsingTraditionalLoop(string title)

        {

            Book foundBook = null;

 

            foreach (var b in this.Books)

            {

                if (b.Title == title)

                {

                    foundBook = b;

                    break;

                }

            }

 

            return foundBook;

        }

 

        /// <summary>

        /// Returns the book using a Linq expression

        /// </summary>

        private Book FindUsingLinq(string title)

        {

            var query = from b in this.Books

                        where b.Title == title

                        select b;

 

            return query.Count() > 0 ? query.ToList()[0] : null;

        }

 

        /// <summary>

        /// Returns the book using a Lambda expression

        /// </summary>

        private Book FindUsingLambda(string title)

        {

            return this.Books.FirstOrDefault(b => b.Title == title);

        }

 

        public void Test()

        {

            Console.WriteLine("Found: {0}", this.FindUsingTraditionalLoop("Pro Silverlight 2 in C# 2008").Author);

            Console.WriteLine("Found: {0}", this.FindUsingLinq("Pro Silverlight 2 in C# 2008").Author);

            Console.WriteLine("Found: {0}", this.FindUsingLambda("Pro Silverlight 2 in C# 2008").Author);

        }

    }

}

As these examples show, you can save time reading and writing your code by using Lambda expressions to find items in a list.

For VB programmers, the syntax of the Lambda expression looks like this:

return Me.Books.FirstOrDefault(Function(b) b.Title = title)


Categories: ASP.Net | C# | VB
Posted by Williarob on Wednesday, January 06, 2010 8:10 AM
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Mock a database repository using Moq

The concept of unit testing my code is still fairly new to me and was introduced when I started writing applications with the Microsoft MVC Framework in Visual Studio 2008.

Intimidated somewhat by the Moq library's heavy reliance on lambdas, my early tests used full Mock classes that I would write myself, and which implemented the same interface as my real database repositories. I'd only write the code for the methods I needed, all other methods would simply throw a "NotImplementedException". However, I quickly discovered that the problem with this approach is that whenever a new method was added to the interface, my test project would no longer build (since the new method was not implemented in my mock repository) and I would have to manually add a new method that threw another "NotImplementedException". After doing this for the 5th or 6th time I decided to face my fears and get to grips with using the Moq library instead. Here is a simple example, of how you can mock a database repository class using the Moq library.

Let's assume that your database contains a table called Product, and that either you or Linq, or LLBLGen, or something similar has created the following class to represent that table as an object in your class library:

The Product Class

namespace MoqRepositorySample

{

    using System;

 

    public class Product

    {

        public int ProductId { get; set; }

 

        public string Name { get; set; }

 

        public string Description { get; set; }

 

        public double Price { get; set; }

 

        public DateTime DateCreated { get; set; }

 

        public DateTime DateModified { get; set; }

    }

}

 

Your Product Repository class might implement an interface similar to the following, which offers basic database functionality such as retrieving a product by id, by name, fetching all products, and a save method that would handle inserting and updating products.

 

The IProductRepository Interface

 

namespace MoqRepositorySample

{

    using System.Collections.Generic;

 

    public interface IProductRepository

    {

        IList<Product> FindAll();

 

        Product FindByName(string productName);

 

        Product FindById(int productId);

 

        bool Save(Product target);

    }

}

 

The test class that follows demonstrates how to use Moq to set up a mock Products repository based on the interface above. The unit tests shown here focus primarily on testing the mock repository itself, rather than on testing how your application uses the repository, as they would in the real world.

 

Microsoft Unit Test Class

 

namespace TestProject1

{

    using System;

    using System.Collections.Generic;

    using System.Linq;

    using Microsoft.VisualStudio.TestTools.UnitTesting;

 

    using Moq;

 

    using MoqRepositorySample;

 

    ///<summary>

    /// Summary description for UnitTest1

    ///</summary>

    [TestClass]

    public class UnitTest1

    {

        ///<summary>

        /// Constructor

        ///</summary>

        public UnitTest1()

        {

            // create some mock products to play with

            IList<Product> products = new List<Product>

                {

                    new Product { ProductId = 1, Name = "C# Unleashed", Description = "Short description here", Price = 49.99 },

                    new Product { ProductId = 2, Name = "ASP.Net Unleashed", Description = "Short description here", Price = 59.99 },

                    new Product { ProductId = 3, Name = "Silverlight Unleashed", Description = "Short description here", Price = 29.99 }

                };

 

            // Mock the Products Repository using Moq

            Mock<IProductRepository> mockProductRepository = new Mock<IProductRepository>();

 

            // Return all the products

            mockProductRepository.Setup(mr => mr.FindAll()).Returns(products);

 

            // return a product by Id

            mockProductRepository.Setup(mr => mr.FindById(It.IsAny<int>())).Returns((int i) => products.Where(x => x.ProductId == i).Single());

 

            // return a product by Name

            mockProductRepository.Setup(mr => mr.FindByName(It.IsAny<string>())).Returns((string s) => products.Where(x => x.Name == s).Single());

 

            // Allows us to test saving a product

            mockProductRepository.Setup(mr => mr.Save(It.IsAny<Product>())).Returns(

                (Product target) =>

                {

                    DateTime now = DateTime.Now;

 

                    if (target.ProductId.Equals(default(int)))

                    {

                        target.DateCreated = now;

                        target.DateModified = now;

                        target.ProductId = products.Count() + 1;

                        products.Add(target);

                    }

                    else

                    {

                        var original = products.Where(q => q.ProductId == target.ProductId).Single();

 

                        if (original == null)

                        {

                            return false;

                        }

 

                        original.Name = target.Name;

                        original.Price = target.Price;

                        original.Description = target.Description;

                        original.DateModified = now;

                    }

 

                    return true;

                });

 

            // Complete the setup of our Mock Product Repository

            this.MockProductsRepository = mockProductRepository.Object;

        }

 

        ///<summary>

        /// Gets or sets the test context which provides

        /// information about and functionality for the current test run.

        ///</summary>

        public TestContext TestContext { get; set; }

 

        ///<summary>

        /// Our Mock Products Repository for use in testing

        ///</summary>

        public readonly IProductRepository MockProductsRepository;

 

        ///<summary>

        /// Can we return a product By Id?

        ///</summary>

        [TestMethod]

        public void CanReturnProductById()

        {

            // Try finding a product by id

            Product testProduct = this.MockProductsRepository.FindById(2);

 

            Assert.IsNotNull(testProduct); // Test if null

            Assert.IsInstanceOfType(testProduct, typeof(Product)); // Test type

            Assert.AreEqual("ASP.Net Unleashed", testProduct.Name); // Verify it is the right product

        }

 

        ///<summary>

        /// Can we return a product By Name?

        ///</summary>

        [TestMethod]

        public void CanReturnProductByName()

        {

            // Try finding a product by Name

            Product testProduct = this.MockProductsRepository.FindByName("Silverlight Unleashed");

 

            Assert.IsNotNull(testProduct); // Test if null

            Assert.IsInstanceOfType(testProduct, typeof(Product)); // Test type

            Assert.AreEqual(3, testProduct.ProductId); // Verify it is the right product

        }

 

        ///<summary>

        /// Can we return all products?

        ///</summary>

        [TestMethod]

        public void CanReturnAllProducts()

        {

            // Try finding all products

            IList<Product> testProducts = this.MockProductsRepository.FindAll();

 

            Assert.IsNotNull(testProducts); // Test if null

            Assert.AreEqual(3, testProducts.Count); // Verify the correct Number

        }

 

        ///<summary>

        /// Can we insert a new product?

        ///</summary>

        [TestMethod]

        public void CanInsertProduct()

        {

            // Create a new product, not I do not supply an id

            Product newProduct = new Product

                { Name = "Pro C#", Description = "Short description here", Price = 39.99 };

 

            int productCount = this.MockProductsRepository.FindAll().Count;

            Assert.AreEqual(3, productCount); // Verify the expected Number pre-insert

 

            // try saving our new product

            this.MockProductsRepository.Save(newProduct);

 

            // demand a recount

            productCount = this.MockProductsRepository.FindAll().Count;

            Assert.AreEqual(4, productCount); // Verify the expected Number post-insert

 

            // verify that our new product has been saved

            Product testProduct = this.MockProductsRepository.FindByName("Pro C#");

            Assert.IsNotNull(testProduct); // Test if null

            Assert.IsInstanceOfType(testProduct, typeof(Product)); // Test type

            Assert.AreEqual(4, testProduct.ProductId); // Verify it has the expected productid

        }

 

        ///<summary>

        /// Can we update a prodict?

        ///</summary>

        [TestMethod]

        public void CanUpdateProduct()

        {

            // Find a product by id

            Product testProduct = this.MockProductsRepository.FindById(1);

 

            // Change one of its properties

            testProduct.Name = "C# 3.5 Unleashed";

 

            // Save our changes.

            this.MockProductsRepository.Save(testProduct);

 

            // Verify the change

            Assert.AreEqual("C# 3.5 Unleashed", this.MockProductsRepository.FindById(1).Name);

        }

    }

}

 

Download the Sample project and run the tests yourself:

MoqRepositorySample.zip (691.96 kb)


Categories: ASP.Net | C# | CodeProject | Moq | MVC | Unit Testing
Posted by Williarob on Tuesday, December 15, 2009 8:17 AM
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Start Building with the Microsoft SDK for Facebook Platform

The Microsoft SDK for Facebook Platform contains rich social features and offers something for almost any kind of Facebook developer who is building with Microsoft technology, whether you're implementing Facebook Connect or are building a Web-based or desktop application. If you're one of the six million Microsoft software developers just starting to build for Facebook, you can use this SDK to make your applications more social, letting your users share and connect with their friends.

Learn more.


Posted by Williarob on Tuesday, November 24, 2009 6:45 AM
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